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Top 5 Underrated YA Books!

Trendsetter Blog Post

Teen Trendsetter Amy is sharing her top 5 Underrated YA books on our blog! You can find her on Twitter @cityofslaylor. 

My Top Five Favorite Underrated YA Books

  1. The Wrong Side of Right by Jenn Marie Thorne

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First off, the cover of this book is beautiful, but the story is pretty beautiful, too. This book is about a girl who is still grieving the death of her mother when she finds out that the father she’s never known is actually a well-known politician. A well-known politician whose presidential campaign is thrust into the spotlight with the news that he has an illegitimate child. The Wrong Side of Right is an entertaining and surprisingly relatable coming-of-age story (a bildungsroman, if you will), that I’m disappointed didn’t get very much attention last year.

  1. Wanderlove by Kirsten Hubbard

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Another coming-of-age book, this novel follows Bria as she backpacks across South America. I have never in my life felt the desire to backpack anywhere, and Wanderlove made it sound, not only interesting, but like something I could see myself doing. This book is perfect for people who loved Just One Day by Gayle Forman (personally, I liked it better) or people who want, love, or even hate to travel. The illustrations throughout this book and the vivid descriptions of the places Bria travels to add even more depth to this already beautiful story. I firmly believe that everyone should read this book the summer before a life-changing event, or anytime really.

  1. The Mockingbirds by Daisy Whitney

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The Mockingbirds deals with a lot of difficult issues, the one that is the focus of the novel being date rape. It raises a lot of compelling questions and makes you think about the way we as a society treat rape victims. This book is set at a boarding school with a reputation for never having a disciplinary infraction. To maintain this image, the administration sweeps any misstep under the rug, and as a result, the students have come up with their own way of doling out justice. The Mockingbirds is the student-run secret society that does the job that the administration will not. The Mockingbirds draws inspiration from To Kill A Mockingbird, and is an incredibly important book.

  1. The Survival Kit by Donna Freitas

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The Survival Kit is a much more serious contemporary, about with a girl dealing with the loss of her mother to cancer. Rose is coping as best she can when she discovers a collection of items that her mother left for her to find; a survival kit. Rose’s journey to find herself after her mother’s death is very moving and heartwarming. There is a very sweet romance and the relationships that Rose has with each member of her family are beautifully written.

  1. The Books of Bayern series by Shannon Hale

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The Goose Girl was one of the first fantasies I read, before I knew anything about genre preferences. Fairy tale retellings have become commonplace in young adult recently, and of all of the ones that I have read since the first time I read The Goose Girl, this series remains my favorite fairy tale retelling. The first book tells the story of Isi, a princess who is to be married off to the prince of a country she has never been to, except she never reaches her new home. Her lady-in-waiting impersonates her and leaves Isi scrambling to prove her identity. There are four books in this series, each following a new set of characters in addition to the characters from the previous books, and all of the characters are compelling and dynamic. The magic system is as easy to understand as it is beautifully written. These books will always hold a special place in my heart, and it makes me sad that more people haven’t read them. I highly recommend them for fans of fantasy, fairy telling, or just books in general.

We’re always looking for more Teen Trendsetters! Email marketing@paperlanternlit.com for information. 

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